Bugging out to where


A lot of preppers think they are going to bug-out to the wilderness when the SHTF, but I have news for them, our civilized world has left very little wilderness to bug-out to. If it were not for our national and state parks, there would be none. All of it would be owned by someone, and if that someone is you, are you going to welcome them onto your property? Probably not.

So bugging-out without a place to go is going to be difficult; for example, my wife and I are traveling along the Outer Banks of North Carolina this week. And if it were not for the national park, all we would see is house after house and retail strip mall after retail strip mall.

So, where will you go to hide? The best place will be on your own property unless you are forced to leave.

Bugging-out, how do you know when its time to go


Leaving your home or bugging-out during a disaster should be a last resort, but you may have to if it becomes or will become life-threatening. So when should you go?

Obviously, you should go if it is about to wipe out your home and supplies; after all, the number one way to survive a disaster is by moving out of its way. But what about a disaster that leaves your home and neighborhood intact? How will you know when it’s time to start bugging-out? Here are a few signs that may help you make the decision.

Power is out

The disaster is local; crews are working to restore power, and neighbors are working together.

This is not the time to leave. It would be best if you worked with your neighbors to protect your street.

Power is out

The disaster is widespread, crews are not working in your area to restore power, but neighbors are working together. Relief agencies have set up supply stations for people to get food and water.

A situation like this is a toss-up if you have a retreat location to bug-out too, but I would stay and work with my neighbors to protect the neighborhood.

Power is out

The disaster is widespread; crews are not working in your area to restore power, and neighbors are not working together. Relief agencies have not set up supply stations for people to get food and water.

It’s time to go if you have a retreat location to go to, but it may be better to stay put if you do not. Moving to a hidden safe room will be your best bet if you have one; if not, it may be you against your neighbors. If you hit the road with nowhere to go, it will be you against everyone else.

 If you cannot leave, you should try to ban together with a few of your neighbors for protection. If you have a valuable skill to offer, they will protect you.