Maybe I’m Wrong

I read a story about a man in Texas who powered up his house during the recent 2021 power outage with his Ford F150 hybrid pickup with a power option.

He states he used the generator to power some lights, coffee pot, TV, toaster oven, space heater, and refrigerator. Said he ran the fridge for about 10 to 12 hours per day to keep the freezer food frozen.

Now maybe I’m wrong, but would it not have been smarter to take the food out of the freezer and set it in a container outside? After all, the temperature never got above freezing during this time.


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Show Your Support for The United States Constitution

Show your support for The United States Constitution by standing with thousands of other patriots in Washington DC this January 6, 2021.

The rally’ permit was submitted by “Women For America First; a conservative group that supports the “America First” agenda.

The application is for use of both Freedom Plaza and Lincoln Memorial.

Congress meets at 1:00 pm.

I will be there documenting it all and posting videos to this site as it unfolds. Hope to see you there.




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Charity


In Aesop’s fable, The Ant and the Grasshopper, some say the ant should have been charitable. But I don’t see it this way. Charity, in my opinion, is for those who have met with misfortune. This was not the case for the Grasshopper. The Grasshopper was lazy and played the summer away.

Today, we have many grasshoppers whose only plan for survival is to live off others’ hard work. When winter comes, they are unprepared and can fault no one but themselves.


The Ant & the Grasshopper

One bright day in late autumn a family of Ants were bustling about in the warm sunshine, drying out the grain they had stored up during the summer, when a starving Grasshopper, his fiddle under his arm, came up and humbly begged for a bite to eat.

“What!” cried the Ants in surprise, “haven’t you stored anything away for the winter? What in the world were you doing all last summer?”

“I didn’t have time to store up any food,” whined the Grasshopper; “I was so busy making music that before I knew it the summer was gone.”

The Ants shrugged their shoulders in disgust.

“Making music, were you?” they cried. “Very well; now dance!” And they turned their backs on the Grasshopper and went on with their work.

There’s a time for work and a time for play.

Living with nothing


Living with nothing; no power, no public water/sewer systems, no grocery stores, no fuel, no nothing. Are you ready to live like that?

I didn’t think so; most people are not. But for the ones who are, life will be a lot easier after a disaster. However, becoming self-reliant does not have to be so dire; you can replace those lost public conveniences with gardens, generators, solar, septic tanks, water wells, etcetera. But those things can fail too. And that’s why you hear people say, “Prepare for the worst and hope for the best.” But I say, hope is highly overrated, so put more thought on the first and go primitive camping with your family every chance you get. It’s the closest you will get to living without modern conveniences, provided you don’t bring them with you.

The Carrico sisters’ parents did this with them, and they credited their parents with their survival after getting lost in the woods.

The Carrico sisters’ 44-hour survival in the wilderness was no miracle; they were well trained by their parents and 4-H Club. And your kids should be too

The art of money getting


A goal of all preppers should be to get out of debt. And to get out of debt, you need to manage your finances and personal life accordingly. In his book The Art of Money Getting, P.T. Barnum asserts that there are no shortcuts to affluence; instead, he stresses the importance of virtue as a foundation for wealth.

This book of timeless counsel from a legendary impresario will prove a helpful companion to readers wishing to make the most of their talents and opportunities to prepare.

Listen to it for free.