Day Zero – Civics Test Questions – Rights and Responsibilities


Daily blog: It’s November 30th, and time to look at questions in the Rights and Responsibilities section of The United States of America’s naturalization test, some of which I have commented on in red.

The civics test is an oral test, and the USCIS officer will ask 20 out of the 128 civics test questions. You must answer at least 12 questions correctly to pass the 2020 version of the civics test.

C: Rights and Responsibilities

63. There are four amendments to the U.S. Constitution about who can vote. Describe one of them. 

  • Citizens eighteen (18) and older (can vote).
  • You don’t have to pay (a poll tax) to vote.
  • Any citizen can vote. (Women and men can vote.)
  • A male citizen of any race (can vote).

64. Who can vote in federal elections, run for federal office, and serve on a jury in the United States?

  • Citizens
  • Citizens of the United States
  • U.S. citizens

65. What are three rights of everyone living in the United States? 

  • Freedom of expression
  • Freedom of speech
  • Freedom of assembly
  • Freedom to petition the government
  • Freedom of religion
  • The right to bear arms

All have been under attack in 2020 by socialist who want to destroy the country.

66. What do we show loyalty to when we say the Pledge of Allegiance?* 

  • The United States 
  • The flag

And I am tired of people protesting in American while holding up another country’s flag.

67. Name two promises that new citizens make in the Oath of Allegiance. 

  • Give up loyalty to other countries
  • Defend the (U.S.) Constitution
  • Obey the laws of the United States 
  • Serve in the military (if needed)
  • Serve (help, do important work for) the nation (if needed)
  • Be loyal to the United States

68. How can people become United States citizens?

  • Naturalize
  • Derive citizenship
  • Be born in the United States

69. What are two examples of civic participation in the United States?

  • Vote                                                                             
  • Run for office
  • Join a political party
  • Help with a campaign
  • Join a civic group
  • Join a community group
  • Give an elected official your opinion (on an issue)
  • Contact elected officials
  • Support or oppose an issue or policy
  • Write to a newspaper

We have all been a little slack when it comes to watching over those who work for us. And we need to start contacting our representatives daily to remind them of their duty to protect the constitution.

70. What is one way Americans can serve their country?

  • Vote                                                                                                 
  • Pay taxes                                                                
  • Obey the law                                                          
  • Serve in the military
  • Run for office
  • Work for local, state, or federal government

71. Why is it important to pay federal taxes?

  • Required by law
  • All people pay to fund the federal government
  • Required by the (U.S.) Constitution (16th Amendment)
  • Civic duty

72. It is important for all men age 18 through 25 to register for the Selective Service. Name onereason why.

  • Required by law
  • Civic duty
  • Makes the draft fair, if needed

Tomorrow we will finish up with the History, Symbols, and Holidays section.


Day Zero represents the time between November 3rd, 2020, and the United States of America’s election results. Day One will begin on decision day.




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Day Zero – Civics Test Questions – System of Government

Daily blog: It’s November 29th, and time to look at questions in the System of Government section of The United States of America’s naturalization test, some of which I have commented on in red.

The civics test is an oral test, and the USCIS officer will ask 20 out of the 128 civics test questions. You must answer at least 12 questions correctly to pass the 2020 version of the civics test.

B: System of Government

16. Name the three branches of government.

  • Legislative, Executive, and Judicial
  • Congress, President, and The Courts

Why the second choice” Is it that hard to remember Legislative, Executive, and Judicial? And the President is not a branch.

17. The President of the United States is in charge of which branch of government?

  • Executive branch

18. What part of the federal government writes laws?

  • (U.S.) Congress
  • (U.S. or national) legislature
  • Legislative branch

Giving three different ways to answer seems confusing to me.

19. What are the two parts of the U.S. Congress?

  • Senate and House (of Representatives)

20. Name one power of the U.S. Congress.

  • Writes laws
  • Declares war
  • Makes the federal budget

21. How many U.S. senators are there?

  • One hundred (100)

22. How long is a term for a U.S. senator?

  • Six (6) years 

We need to put term limits on senators.

23. Who is one of your state’s U.S. senators now?

  • Answers will vary. [District of Columbia residents and residents of U.S. territories should answer that D.C. (or the territory where the applicant lives) has no U.S. senators.]

A lot of people can not answer this one, and that needs to change.

24. How many voting members are in the House of Representatives?

  • Four hundred thirty-five (435)

25. How long is a term for a member of the House of Representatives?

  • Two (2) years 

26. Why do U.S. representatives serve shorter terms than U.S. senators?

  • To more closely follow public opinion.

I am beginning to think they don’t care about our opinions anymore.

27. How many senators does each state have?

  • Two (2)

28. Why does each state have two senators?

  • Equal representation (for small states)
  • The Great Compromise (Connecticut Compromise)

29. Name your U.S. representative. 

  • Answers will vary. [Residents of territories with nonvoting Delegates or Resident Commissioners may provide the name of that Delegate or Commissioner. Also acceptable is any statement that the territory has no (voting) representatives in Congress.

A lot of people can not answer this one, and that needs to change.

30. What is the name of the Speaker of the House of Representatives now?* 

31. Who does a U.S. senator represent?

  • Citizens of their state

Our senators need to be reminded of this because all too often, they only represent their party.

32. Who elects U.S. senators?

  • Citizens from their state

33. Who does a member of the House of Representatives represent?

  • Citizens in their (congressional) district
  • Citizens in their district

Our representatives need to be reminded of this because all too often, they only represent their party, leaving their districts in shambles.

34. Who elects members of the House of Representatives? 

  • Citizens from their (congressional) district

35. Some states have more representatives than other states. Why?

  • (Because of) the state’s population
  • (Because) they have more people
  • (Because) some states have more people

I hate these three different ways you can answer questions. Just pick one and go with it, test makers.

36. The President of the United States is elected for how many years?* 

  • Four (4) years

37. The President of the United States can serve only two terms. Why?

  • (Because of) the 22nd Amendment
  • To keep the President from becoming too powerful

38. What is the name of the President of the United States now?*

39. What is the name of the Vice President of the United States now?* 

40. If the President can no longer serve, who becomes President? 

  • The Vice President (of the United States)

41. Name one power of the President. 

  • Signs bills into law                        
  • Vetoes bills                             
  • Enforces laws
  • Commander in Chief (of the military)
  • Chief diplomat

42. Who is Commander in Chief of the U.S. military?

  • The President (of the United States)

43. Who signs bills to become laws?

  • The President (of the United States)

44. Who vetoes bills?*

  • The President (of the United States)

45. Who appoints federal judges? 

  • The President (of the United States)

46. The executive branch has many parts. Name one.

  • President (of the United States)
  • Cabinet
  • Federal departments and agencies

47. What does the President’s Cabinet do?

  • Advises the President (of the United States)

48. What are two Cabinet-level positions?

  • Attorney General
  • Secretary of Agriculture
  • Secretary of Commerce
  • Secretary of Defense
  • Secretary of Education            
  • Secretary of Energy                               
  • Secretary of Health and Human Services
  • Secretary of Homeland Security
  • Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
  • Secretary of the Interior
  • Secretary of Labor
  • Secretary of State 
  • Secretary of Transportation
  • Secretary of the Treasury
  • Secretary of Veterans Affairs
  • Vice President (of the United States)

49. Why is the Electoral College important?

  • It decides who is elected President.
  • It provides a compromise between the popular election of the President and congressional selection.

50. What is one part of the judicial branch?

  • Supreme Court
  • Federal Courts

51. What does the judicial branch do? 

  • Reviews laws
  • Explains laws
  • Resolves disputes (disagreements) about the law
  • Decides if a law goes against the (U.S.) Constitution 

52. What is the highest court in the United States? 

  • Supreme Court

53. How many seats are on the Supreme Court?

  • Nine (9) 

54. How many Supreme Court justices are usually needed to decide a case?

  • Five (5)

55. How long do Supreme Court justices serve?

  • (For) life
  • Lifetime appointment
  • (Until) retirement

56. Supreme Court justices serve for life. Why?

  • To be independent (of politics)
  • To limit outside (political) influence

57. Who is the Chief Justice of the United States now? 

58. Name one power that is only for the federal government.

  • Print paper money
  • Mint coins 
  • Declare war
  • Create an army
  • Make treaties
  • Set foreign policy

59. Name one power that is only for the states.

  • Provide schooling and education
  • Provide protection (police)
  • Provide safety (fire departments)
  • Give a driver’s license
  • Approve zoning and land use

60. What is the purpose of the 10th Amendment?

  • (It states that the) powers not given to the federal government belong to the states or to the people.

61. Who is the governor of your state now?* 

  • Answers will vary. [District of Columbia residents should answer that D.C. does not have a governor.]

62. What is the capital of your state?

  • Answers will vary. [District of Columbia residents should answer that D.C. is not a state and does not have a capital. Residents of U.S. territories should name the capital of the territory.]

Tomorrow we will go over questions 63 through 72 in section C: Rights and Responsibilities.


Day Zero represents the time between November 3rd, 2020, and the United States of America’s election results. Day One will begin on decision day.




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Day Zero – Representatives And The Civics Test Questions – Principles of American Government

Daily blog: It’s November 28th, and we have members of congress who do not know the three branches of government. One being Alabama’s Senator-elect Tommy Tuberville, a Republican, who said the three branches were the house, the senate, and the executive. And the other, Alexandria Ocasio-Corteother, a Democrat who said the presidency, the senate, and the house. Scary Right and they want to govern you.

I think it’s time to have our representatives pass the same civics test given to all naturalization applicants.

The civics test is an oral test, and the USCIS officer will ask 20 out of the 128 civics test questions. You must answer at least 12 questions correctly to pass the 2020 version of the civics test.

Today we will look over questions 1 through 15 in Section A: Principles of American Government. And I will comment on some in red.

A: Principles of American Government

1. What is the form of government of the United States?

  • Republic
  • Constitution-based federal republic
  • Representative democracy

As you can see, they give three possible answers. But why? The answer should be a Republic. It’s that simple. “to the Republic for which it stands.” Does that ring a bell for anyone? Yes, you could say it was the other two, but why make it hard.

2. What is the supreme law of the land?*

  • (U.S.) Constitution

Correct and why so many socialists want to change it.

3. Name one thing the U.S. Constitution does.

  • Forms the government
  • Defines powers of government
  • Defines the parts of government
  • Protects the rights of the people

It does all of these. And the ‘rights of the people’ are being trampled by governors who need to be held accountable.

4. The U.S. Constitution starts with the words “We the People.” What does “We the People” mean?

  • Self-government
  • Popular sovereignty
  • Consent of the governed
  • People should govern themselves
  • (Example of) social contract

The answers given don’t make sense to me; debate me if you choose, but “We Te People” simply means the United States of America’s citizens.

We are not a social contract.

5. How are changes made to the U.S. Constitution?

  • Amendments
  • The amendment process

6. What does the Bill of Rights protect?

  • (The basic) rights of Americans
  • (The basic) rights of people living in the United States

What the hell are (Basic Rights)? It protects The Rights of all American citizens.

7. How many amendments does the U.S. Constitution have?*

  • Twenty-seven (27)

These amendments are under attack by traitors from within, so we must be vigilant and protect them.

8. Why is the Declaration of Independence important?

  • It says America is free from British control.
  • It says all people are created equal.
  • It identifies inherent rights.
  • It identifies individual freedoms.

9. What founding document said the American colonies were free from Britain?

  • Declaration of Independence

10. Name two important ideas from the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.

  • Equality
  • Liberty
  • Social contract
  • Natural rights
  • Limited government
  • Self-government

Here’s that word “Social Contract” again. Social Justice Warriors like to use words like that.

Let’s look at the definition of the words constitution and social contract.

Constitution: the basic principles and laws of a nation, state, or social group that determine the powers and duties of the government and guarantee certain rights to the people in it.

Social Contract: an actual or hypothetical agreement among the members of an organized society or between a community and its ruler that defines and limits the rights and duties of each.

See the difference?

11. The words “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” are in what founding document?

  • Declaration of Independence

12. What is the economic system of the United States?

  • Capitalism
  • Free market economy

Correct, but the government bailing out businesses because they are too big to fail should not happen in a free market. The threat of failure keeps things competitive.

13. What is the rule of law?

  • Everyone must follow the law.
  • Leaders must obey the law.
  • Government must obey the law.
  • No one is above the law.

All true, so why have we not seen more arrests. Politicians are routinely breaking the law and seem to be getting away with it.

14. Many documents influenced the U.S. Constitution. Name one.

  • Declaration of Independence
  • Articles of Confederation
  • Federalist Papers
  • Anti-Federalist Papers
  • Virginia Declaration of Rights
  • Fundamental Orders of Connecticut
  • Mayflower Compact
  • Iroquois Great Law of Peace

How many college students know about these documents. Our history has been abandon by the school system.

15. There are three branches of government. Why?

  • So one part does not become too powerful
  • Checks and balances
  • Separation of powers

We need all three branches to start checking each other again. All too often, we a find them in bed with one another.

Tomorrow we will go over questions 16 through 62 in Section B: System of Government.


Day Zero represents the time between November 3rd, 2020, and the United States of America’s election results. Day One will begin on decision day.




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Day Zero – Conspiracy Theory

Daily blog: It’s November 27th, and you are a conspiracy theorist if you do not believe the approved narrative pushed out by the news and social networks.

To question them with a theory void of facts is–well, socialist blasphemy. How dare you lowly Proles think for yourself. To do so makes you a conspiracist. But have no fear; they are working on interventions to help you reduce conspiracy beliefs, including maintaining an open society and improving the general public’s analytical thinking skills.

However, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, a theory can be:

aa hypothesis assumed for the sake of argument or investigation

ban unproved assumptionCONJECTURE

So why are they afraid of you? Why do forum moderators, social fact-checkers, and the like feel the need to protect the public from your thoughts?

Simple, because all too often, those theories of yours become facts; for example:

The Deep State: was called a conspiracy theory.

An RFID chip in your arm was called a conspiracy theory.

A Social Credit System for individuals: was called a conspiracy theory.

A facial recognition system to track your movements was called a conspiracy theory.

And a cashless society was once called a conspiracy theory.

I could go on, but to do so will get me labeled a conspiracy theorist. And I must not think for myself.


“It is the rare fortune of these days that one may think what one likes and say what one thinks.”

― Tacitus, Histories of Tacitus


Day Zero represents the time between November 3rd, 2020, and the United States of America’s election results. Day One will begin on decision day.




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Microfiction – Mr. Sims


The screen flashed, and a message appeared.

Hello, Mr. Sims. I have a few questions for you?

Mr. Sims looked down at his phone for a minute, then replied.

Who is this?

You’ve been a little out of character this week. Why have you disobeyed the governor’s orders? You are putting us at risk.

We’re not at risk, and the numbers are wrong.

I did not say you were at risk.

Then who were you referring to?

US, your representatives, and your disobedience is putting our power in jeopardy.

But–

Sorry, Mr. Sims, game over. You have been deemed non-essential, and will be deleted.

“Wait!” Mr. Sims exclaimed as all evidence of his life slowly turned to bits.

Day Zero – You Are Free

Daily blog: It’s November 26th, Thanksgiving. And you are free to pray to a God of your choosing because we live in The United States of America where our Constitution protects individual rights and liberty. And our second amendment protects the Constitution.

AMENDMENT I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


AMENDMENT II

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.


Day Zero represents the time between November 3rd, 2020, and the United States of America’s election results. Day One will begin on decision day.




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Day Zero – Dark Winter


Daily blog: It’s November 25th. And North Carolina’s socialist governor Roy Cooper has fallen in line with other states to put their new strategy into motion.

It’s a Grimms’ Fairy Tale in the making called Dark Winter, and it will be a roaring success with today’s immature adults who need nannies to care for them.

“Be Scared,” their propaganda minions will cry. “lock yourself in your homes; no Thanksgiving or Christmas for you. And knock off Easter too.”

So, shutter your blinds, you lost little souls, and hide under your beds as the banshee nears; her wailing warns of impending death.

Her name is Karen, and she works for the health department.


Karen is a pejorative term for someone perceived as entitled or demanding beyond the scope of what is appropriate or necessary. 

Day Zero represents the time between November 3rd, 2020, and the United States of America’s election results. Day One will begin on decision day.




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Day Zero – The Worthless Generation


Daily blog: It’s November 24th, and I wonder what the brave men and women who died for our freedom think of us now. Do they look upon us as The Worthless Generation?

A generation that let politicians lock them down.

A generation that let politicians give them a curfew.

A generation that let politicians tell them who they can have over for the holidays.

A generation that let politicians close mom and pop businesses while leaving Big Box stores open.

A generation that let politicians decide who works and who doesn’t.

A generation that looked the other way when they saw fraud committed during an election.

A generation that let politicians decide what their children were taught.

A generation that allowed disgusting porn to be a click away from their children.

A generation that let politicians spy on them.

A generation that begged for hand-outs instead of taking care of themselves.

A generation that believed whatever the media told them.

A generation that was lazy.

A generation of cowards.

A worthless generation.

Is this how we will be defined?


In the 1950s, kids lost their innocence.

They were liberated from their parents by well-paying jobs, cars, and lyrics in music that gave rise to a new term —the generation gap.

In the 1960s, kids lost their authority.

It was a decade of protest—church, state, and parents were all called into question and found wanting. Their authority was rejected, yet nothing ever replaced it.

In the 1970s, kids lost their love. It was the decade of me-ism dominated by hyphenated words beginning with self.

Self-image, Self-esteem, Self-assertion… It made for a lonely world. Kids learned everything there was to know about sex and forgot everything there was to know about love, and no one had the nerve to tell them there was a difference.

In the 1980s, kids lost their hope.

Stripped of innocence, authority, and love and plagued by the horror of a nuclear nightmare, large and growing numbers of this generation stopped believing in the future.

In the 1990s, kids lost their power to reason. Less and less were they taught the very basics of language, truth, and logic, and they grew up with the irrationality of a postmodern world.

In the new millennium, kids woke up and found out that somewhere in the midst of all this change, they had lost their imagination. Violence and perversion entertained them till none could talk of killing innocents since none was innocent anymore.”

― Ravi Zacharias, Recapture the Wonder


Day Zero represents the time between November 3rd, 2020, and the United States of America’s election results. Day One will begin on decision day.



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